Press releases

Agriculture

Cod has a key role in the whole Baltic Sea

18 April, 2012 - SLU

A new investigation put in evidence the key role of cod as regulator of the whole Baltic Sea ecosystem. The study shows that when the cod population in the central Baltic increases, it spreads into larger areas and spills over into adjacent marginal systems where it usually does not occur, as for example the Gulf of Riga.

SLU will lead new cooperation project in the Baltic Sea region

3 February, 2012 - SLU

The Department of Forest Resource Management at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences has received EU funding of 3.3 million euro for the project “The Baltic Landscape in change – innovative approaches towards sustainable forested landscapes”. The project will run until the end of June 2014.

Sensational bird finding in China

19 December, 2011 - SLU

In June 2011, a team of Chinese and Swedish researchers rediscovered the breeding area for the poorly known Blackthroat Luscinia obscura, in the Qinling mountains, Shaanxi province, north central China.

Effects of deforestation and expansion of agriculture in Peruvian highland jungle

24 October, 2011 - Linnéuniversitetet

In her dissertation Environmental effects of agricultural expansion in the upper Amazon – a study of river basin geochemistry, hydrochemistry, and farmers´ perceptions, Lina Lindell, a researcher in environmental science at Linnaeus University in Sweden, examines the geochemical status of the natural environment in the Amazonas Region, and to what extent it has been impacted by deforestation and altered land use.

Scientists initiate action plan to advance cultured meat

5 September, 2011 - Chalmers tekniska högskola

Late last week, an international group of scientists took a step closer to their goal to produce cultured meat. They agreed on important common positions about how to bring the research forward during a workshop in Gothenburg, Sweden, arranged by Chalmers University of Technology and the European Science Foundation.

Mysterious soil fungi identified

12 August, 2011 - SLU

Researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala, Sweden, have cultivated and classified fungi that had previously been known only through DNA sequences. The fungi, which have lived hidden underground for millions of years, represent a class of fungi that is new to scientists, Archaeorhizomycetes. The findings are being published in the scientific journal Science on August 12.

Producing cold-tolerant oats for autumn sowing in Sweden

29 June, 2011 - Göteborgs universitet

Oat is the sixth most important cereal in the world. Traditionally it has been used for feed, but it’s importance as a food crop is steadily growing due to it’s unique health beneficial properties. Unfortunately, oat cannot be grown as a winter crop in Sweden. To remedy this, researchers at the University of Gothenburg are now in the process to develop new, more cold-tolerant winter oat varieties.

Basic research enhances potential for cultivation in extreme climates

9 May, 2011 - Umeå universitet

Research on gene expression has resulted in plants that can survive drought, high salt concentrations, and infections. This opens the possibility of forestry in harsh climates. The plants produce more leaves than usual, which mean that they can yield more food per plant. These are the findings of researchers at Umeå University in Sweden in an article in the Proceedings of the American Academy of Sciences, PNAS.

Multimillion-crown commitment to research to reduce energy consumption

23 February, 2011 - Mittuniversitetet

FSCN, the Fibre Science and Communication Network research center at Mid Sweden University will pursue research on energy-efficient production of mechanical and chemimechanical pulping processes. This will be done in collaboration with the companies SCA, Stora Enso, Holmen, Metso, and Andritz. Mid Sweden University will receive SEK 36 million from the Knowledge Foundation, and the business community will make research commitments corresponding in value to the Knowledge Foundation investment. On top of this, the University is providing SEK 12 million.

New discovery about how flowering time of plants can be controlled

7 December, 2010 - SLU

Researchers at Umeå Plant Science Center in Sweden discovered, in collaboration with the Syngenta company, a previously unknown gene in sugar beets that blocks flowering. Only with the cold of winter is the gene shut off, allowing the sugar beet to blossom in its second year. The discovery of this new gene function makes it possible to control when sugar beets bloom.